BONE FOR TUNA

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This is where Nature meets Science, Art, Books and a couple rap songs.

did-you-kno:

The creator of Powerpuff Girls, the creator of Dexter’s Laboratory, and the creator of Johnny Bravo were all roommates in college.
Source

did-you-kno:

The creator of Powerpuff Girls, the creator of Dexter’s Laboratory, and the creator of Johnny Bravo were all roommates in college.

Source

— 9 hours ago with 7604 notes
"From symbiosis to parasitism is a short step. The word is now a virus. The flu virus may have once been a healthy lung cell. It is now a parasitic organism that invades and damages the central nervous system. Modern man has lost the option of silence. Try halting sub-vocal speech. Try to achieve even ten seconds of inner silence. You will encounter a resisting organism that forces you to talk. That organism is the word."
William S. Burroughs, The Ticket That Exploded (via tarkovskian)
— 1 day ago with 14 notes
infinity-imagined:

G292.0+1.8; an oxygen rich supernova remnant 20,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.  Supernovas create most the elements in the universe heavier than hydrogen, their remnants often condense to form new stars and planets.  Most of the atoms of our bodies, the earth, oceans and atmosphere were formed billions of years ago in objects like this one.

infinity-imagined:

G292.0+1.8; an oxygen rich supernova remnant 20,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus.  Supernovas create most the elements in the universe heavier than hydrogen, their remnants often condense to form new stars and planets.  Most of the atoms of our bodies, the earth, oceans and atmosphere were formed billions of years ago in objects like this one.

— 1 day ago with 229 notes

luxhysteria:

Jupiter’s great red spot. A hurricane three times the size of our whole planet that’s been raging for centuries.

(via likeaphysicist)

— 2 days ago with 22412 notes
txchnologist:

To celebrate the 15th anniversary of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, four new images of supernova remnants are being released. These spectacular cosmic vistas are the glowing debris fields that were created when massive stars exploded at the ends of their lives.
Chandra, one of NASA’s current “Great Observatories,” along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions of the universe. It obits up to 86,500 miles above the Earth.
To celebrate Chandra’s 15th anniversary, four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – were released by the space agency. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra to capture them in exquisite detail. See a larger version here.
Courtesy NASA.
Read More

txchnologist:

To celebrate the 15th anniversary of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, four new images of supernova remnants are being released. These spectacular cosmic vistas are the glowing debris fields that were created when massive stars exploded at the ends of their lives.

Chandra, one of NASA’s current “Great Observatories,” along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions of the universe. It obits up to 86,500 miles above the Earth.

To celebrate Chandra’s 15th anniversary, four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – were released by the space agency. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra to capture them in exquisite detail. See a larger version here.

Courtesy NASA.

Read More

(via science-junkie)

— 2 days ago with 828 notes
asapscience:

It is Monday so … HERE IS DRAKE! #nonewfriends

asapscience:

It is Monday so … HERE IS DRAKE! #nonewfriends

— 3 days ago with 215 notes
distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.
However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.
The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.
While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.

However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.

The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.

While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

(Source: spacetelescope.org)

— 3 days ago with 262 notes
asapscience:

Looks strikingly similar to a galaxy spiral?
via Reddit

asapscience:

Looks strikingly similar to a galaxy spiral?

via Reddit

— 3 days ago with 883 notes

Page 113 is what The Ticket that Exploded is all about right?
This book is crazy!

— 3 days ago
#william burroughs  #the ticket that exploded  #words  #sex  #colour  #image  #control  #government  #addiction