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thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

— 5 hours ago with 3898 notes

Im back at uni and my room is full of spiders and flies. There is a pile of tiny dead flies near my window. Webs are in every corner and these spiders have tiny bodies but really long legs. In fact, there are spiders everywhere in this house. One massive one in the bathtub just chilling. Its true, city spiders are getting bigger! How do they get here?!
I really like insects, bugs and spiders but not really touching them.. wonder why so people are scared of them though???

— 1 day ago
#insects  #university  #bugs  #spiders  #fear  #phobia 

I know its bad but I squished this daddy long legs but before that I had whacked it a couple times. And after a while that crazy motherfucker is still buzzing about in the plastic bag inside the bin, inching its way closer to the top to fly back out. This guy is immortal and massive and scary as hell.

— 1 day ago
#daddy long legs  #buzz  #insect  #immortality  #shiiiiiit 

thejunglenook:

pbsnature:

Baby crested black macaques! One man’s mission to save these endangered primates on Nature on PBS http://to.pbs.org/1gdsUHX ”The Funkiest Monkeys” on Jan. 29 

(Macaca nigra)
To hold you over till Jan. 29th, read up on the behavior of these amazing macaques at Primate Factsheets.

(via creativeconservationist)

— 1 day ago with 19948 notes
compoundchem:

With autumn on the horizon, this graphic looks at the chemicals behind the myriad colours of autumn leaves; bigger version & download here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-sn

compoundchem:

With autumn on the horizon, this graphic looks at the chemicals behind the myriad colours of autumn leaves; bigger version & download here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-sn

(via polymath4ever)

— 3 days ago with 3154 notes
"Astronomy compels the soul to look upward, and leads us from this world to another."
Plato, The Republic (via whats-out-there)

(via theapewhoguardsthebalance)

— 3 days ago with 928 notes

asylum-art:

3d Marker Drawn Murals and Impressive Installations

Marker Installations by Heike Weber

Raumarbeite: utopia 2007, paintmarker on polystyrol, videoloop 465 x 465 x 270 cm, Transfer Türkiye-NRW, Museum Bochum

Germany-based artist Heike Weber needs only two tools in her work: permanent markers and endless patience. The artist decorates large spaces by tracing thousands of loopy lines on the walls, floor, and sometimes even the ceiling. Some of her installations measure around 5000 ft!

Heike starts her work by drawing the pattern on a sheet of paper, and then transfers it onto the surface. By carefully adjusting the white spaces, she gives a feeling as if the room is swirling. Aren’t you getting dizzy just looking at them?

photo: Carl-Victor Dahmen

(via asylum-art)

— 3 days ago with 2469 notes
humansofnewyork:

"I don’t have any dreams. What’s the point? I’m poor. I don’t have any skills. I wash the utensils in the kitchen— that’s what I do. But I like the girls I work with. We make fun together. I tell jokes. They tell jokes. I’m happy— it’s in my nature."
(New Delhi, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I don’t have any dreams. What’s the point? I’m poor. I don’t have any skills. I wash the utensils in the kitchen— that’s what I do. But I like the girls I work with. We make fun together. I tell jokes. They tell jokes. I’m happy— it’s in my nature."

(New Delhi, India)

— 3 days ago with 5351 notes

"Tok nid acsion, ip no acsion, no tok"

— 3 days ago
#dad 

Getting hyped for uni by reading Letters to a Young Scientist.
Probably a bit too far gone but still…

— 3 days ago
#university  #letterstoayoungscientist  #e.o wilson  #science  #scienceruuuuuuuules 
larstheyeti:

Only a couple days left in the heart and brain kickstarter: http://yetikickstarter.com

larstheyeti:

Only a couple days left in the heart and brain kickstarter: http://yetikickstarter.com

(via laboratoryequipment)

— 3 days ago with 24646 notes
distant-traveller:

Spectacular view of the Rosette nebula

The Rosette Nebula, taken on September 9, 2014. A 5 hour exposure, using an Epsilon 180 ED telescope, with filters of 3nm Astrodon combining Hydrogen-alpha, Oxygen and Sulfur II.

Image credit and copyright: César Cantú

distant-traveller:

Spectacular view of the Rosette nebula

The Rosette Nebula, taken on September 9, 2014. A 5 hour exposure, using an Epsilon 180 ED telescope, with filters of 3nm Astrodon combining Hydrogen-alpha, Oxygen and Sulfur II.

Image credit and copyright: César Cantú

(Source: universetoday.com)

— 3 days ago with 421 notes

asylum-art:

Animals Painted On Delicate Feather Canvases by Jamie Homeister

on Facebook

Jamie Homeister, a folk artist from New Albany, Indiana, paints exquisite portraits of animals and birds on the most unusual canvas – feathers. Her magnificent featherwork is influenced by her Canadian heritage, but she also depicts themes from Native American culture.

Jamie receives the feather that she works on from the people who commission her to paint images of their birds – the same ones that actually shed the feathers. “I do much of it by commission – many of my parrot-feather paintings depict the parrots from whom the feathers themselves fell,” the artist explains.

“I’ve always been intrigued by the lifestyles of all those who walked this Earth before us, so feather painting just always made sense to me,” Jamie said. “Featherwork is incredibly humbling media. The feathers splice, buckle, splinter and shed under the weight of paint.”

(via asylum-art)

— 3 days ago with 2750 notes