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This is where Science meets Nature, Art, Books and a couple rap songs.

todayinhistory:

April 23rd 1616: William Shakespeare dies

On this day in 1616, the famous English poet and playwright William Shakespeare passed away on his 52nd birthday. Shakespeare, from Stratford-upon-Avon,  became famous for his plays including Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and King Lear; he wrote around 38 plays and 154 sonnets. He was married to a woman named Anne Hathaway and had three children. In his will he left most of his estate to his eldest daughter Susanna and to his wife left “my second best bed”. He was buried in the chancel of the Holy Trinity Church. Today, on the 450th anniversary of his birth, Shakespeare is still considered one of the greatest writers of the English language in history.

"Good friend, for Jesus’ sake, forbear
To dig the dust enclosed here;
Blessed be the man that spares these stones
And cursed he that moves my bones.”
- Shakespeare’s epitaph

— 6 hours ago with 438 notes
laboratoryequipment:

Space Observatory Spies Rare Pair of Black HolesA pair of supermassive black holes in orbit around one another have been spotted by the European Space Agency’s X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission, XMM-Newton. This is the first time such a pair have been seen in an ordinary galaxy. They were discovered because they ripped apart a star when the space observatory happened to be looking in their direction.Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. Two supermassive black holes are the smoking gun that the galaxy has merged with another. Thus, finding binary supermassive black holes can tell astronomers about how galaxies evolved into their present-day shapes and sizes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/space-observatory-spies-rare-pair-black-holes

laboratoryequipment:

Space Observatory Spies Rare Pair of Black Holes

A pair of supermassive black holes in orbit around one another have been spotted by the European Space Agency’s X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission, XMM-Newton. This is the first time such a pair have been seen in an ordinary galaxy. They were discovered because they ripped apart a star when the space observatory happened to be looking in their direction.

Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. Two supermassive black holes are the smoking gun that the galaxy has merged with another. Thus, finding binary supermassive black holes can tell astronomers about how galaxies evolved into their present-day shapes and sizes.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/space-observatory-spies-rare-pair-black-holes

— 6 hours ago with 42 notes
lecollecteur:

Egon Schiele, Schlafendes Paar [Sleeping Couple], 1909.
Pencil on paper, 32 x 30 cm.

lecollecteur:

Egon Schiele, Schlafendes Paar [Sleeping Couple], 1909.

Pencil on paper, 32 x 30 cm.

(Source: blastedheath, via hvteplusenvy)

— 21 hours ago with 5131 notes
"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via science-junkie)

— 21 hours ago with 13228 notes

jtotheizzoe:

 

"To know that no one before you has seen an organ you are examining, to trace relationships that have occurred to no one before, to immerse yourself in the wondrous crystalline world of the microscope, where silence reigns, circumscribed by its own horizon, a blindingly white arena — all this is so enticing that I cannot describe it."

- Vladimir Nabokov, born on this day, April 22, 1899

Such a beautiful description of the pleasure of investigation, capturing the intensely personal joy that accompanies a moment of discovery.

Nabokov was a man of few passions, but to writing and butterflies, his two most beloved arenas, he devoted himself completely. Both of these, though, seem to pale in comparison to his love for Vera, Nabokov’s wife, translator and muse.

Nabokov was no mere hobbyist when it came to the study of Lepidoptera. He dedicated much of his life to observing, collecting and drawing butterflies. So serious was his study that a major theory of butterfly evolution was proven correct by molecular biologists decades after he proposed it.

Thanks to Open Culture, I learned that Nabokov would often draw butterflies for Vera, sketched in the first few pages of books he would give her (above). Many, if not all of them, were imagined species, based on specimens from his study, but created and named solely for her. Vanessa verae, for one, is a midnight and blue variant of the Vanessa genus. These belonged to her alone, an unmatchable gift of pure fantasy. Who among you ladies wouldn’t swoon if you were given your own butterfly? Looks like I’ve got some work to do for Christmas or Valentine’s Day.

Vanessa appears again in Nabokov’s work, in both human and insect form, as the “crimson-barred” and “Admirable butterfly” wife of John Shade in Pale Fire. Brian Boyd wrote that no other author “…has been a more passionate student of the natural world or a more accomplished scientist.”

Although perhaps not as deeply as Nabokov, many (most?) artists have taken notes from science and nature, and their work has been made all the richer for it. I wonder what we would discover if we did the same for science, accepting that our act of observation, interpretation and creation is not that different from drawing butterflies, an act we undertake simply for the love of seeing something new, and giving it to another?

If you enjoyed this intersection of lepidoptery with love, don’t miss Nabokov’s hand-written margin notes on the entomology of Kafka’s Metamorphosis.

— 21 hours ago with 466 notes
visualizingmath:

allofthemath:

This, ladies and gentlemen and genderqueer folks, is Pascal’s tetrahedron, a three dimensional analogue of Pascal’s triangle, and it’s pretty freaking great.


I’ve never heard of this before!

visualizingmath:

allofthemath:

This, ladies and gentlemen and genderqueer folks, is Pascal’s tetrahedron, a three dimensional analogue of Pascal’s triangle, and it’s pretty freaking great.

I’ve never heard of this before!

— 21 hours ago with 920 notes
"And then we never spoke again."
my 6 word story  (via phoe-bs)

(Source: un8common, via emzgalz)

— 23 hours ago with 39060 notes
catfgarcia:

something new to stick on my wall

catfgarcia:

something new to stick on my wall

(via freedomforwhales)

— 2 days ago with 576 notes
distant-traveller:

Massive nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2841

It is one of the more massive galaxies known. A mere 46 million light-years distant, spiral galaxy NGC 2841 can be found in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. This sharp view of the gorgeous island universe shows off a striking yellow nucleus and galactic disk. Dust lanes, small, pink star-forming regions, and young blue star clusters are embedded in the patchy, tightly wound spiral arms.In contrast, many other spirals exhibit grand, sweeping arms with large star-forming regions. NGC 2841 has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years, even larger than our own Milky Way and captured by this composite image merging exposures from the orbiting 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. X-ray images suggest that resulting winds and stellar explosions create plumes of hot gas extending into a halo around NGC 2841.

Image credit: Hubble, Subaru; Composition & Copyright: Robert Gendler

distant-traveller:

Massive nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2841

It is one of the more massive galaxies known. A mere 46 million light-years distant, spiral galaxy NGC 2841 can be found in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. This sharp view of the gorgeous island universe shows off a striking yellow nucleus and galactic disk. Dust lanes, small, pink star-forming regions, and young blue star clusters are embedded in the patchy, tightly wound spiral arms.In contrast, many other spirals exhibit grand, sweeping arms with large star-forming regions. NGC 2841 has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years, even larger than our own Milky Way and captured by this composite image merging exposures from the orbiting 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. X-ray images suggest that resulting winds and stellar explosions create plumes of hot gas extending into a halo around NGC 2841.

Image credit: Hubble, Subaru; Composition & Copyright: Robert Gendler

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

— 2 days ago with 163 notes